Two Poems


George Hayles was born in Manchester in 1980. He has taught in South Korea, Japan and Mozambique. His poetry has been published in The Frogmore Papers, Cicero, Trans-Capita, and several other journals in the UK and United States. Five years ago he moved to Galway to teach English. He is currently working on his first collection of poems.



THINKING OF MY PEN PAL IN NEW JERSEY WHILE SURFING OFF THE WEST COAST OF IRELAND

 

Sometimes
when my arms are sore
and hang in the water
like lazy fish
and my cheek
is pressed against the board
and my eyes
half shut against the sun

and the only sound
in the universe
is the slap
of each wave
like the slow
sarcastic clap of God
congratulating me
on a life well spent

then sometimes

I turn my head
and watch the ocean
curving toward you
and the threads
of longitude draw in
and I want to hold
them—keep them bunched
like a handful of wild flowers

 


 

ANTI

 

A hundred days have passed
and still
nothing changes.

The sun eases through
sharp fingerings of alder;
the woods go dark.

Light leaves my house slowly,
retreating from the kitchen
like spilled oil

and I’m left floundering to bed,
the moon’s back turned towards me—

your presence bunched
like clumps of dark matter
on the cold floor.

 


George Hayles

About

George Hayles was born in Manchester in 1980. He moved to Galway five years ago to teach English. He is currently working on his first collection of poems.